Our Ministries

Helping our neighbors when they are struggling, when they want to start living healthier, and when they want to know Jesus is a vital part of the San Marcos Seventh-day Adventist Church. We are involved in a variety of ministries within our community and in mission in other countries.

Job Descriptions

Adventurer Club Director & Staff

Duties:

The Adventurer Club Director will:

  1. Communicate with the church and community in order to promote the club. The conference Adventurer coordinator provides guidance in running the club, and may ask for regular reports to be sent to the conference office. The Adventurer Club Director and staff will help to set the major policies and goals for the Adventurer club. The church board should be consulted regarding major decisions.
  2. Staff the Adventurer Club with caring, well-qualified adults and teens. The Adventurer director will seek out persons who are clearly growing in the love of Jesus, love children and work well with them. The director will see that each staff member is trained carefully and given a job which is appropriate to the interests of the club.
  3. Organize the Adventurer Club by working with the staff to identify what goals and objectives need to be accomplished in the coming year. The director and staff may choose the general types of activities to take place. Staff are assigned to lead out in each area. Then a budget is set up, based on the income from church appropriation, club dues, and fundraising. Finally, an amount is designated for each area of the club to spend.
  4. Plan the club meetings and yearly calendar. Make a schedule of activities for each regular club meeting, and a yearly calendar which may include regular club meetings, special activity nights, family nights, Adventurer Family Network meetings, and yearly events such as Induction and Investiture.
  5. Evaluate how well the club is reaching its goals. Take time at staff meetings to discuss ideas and concerns. Use what is learned to create a better, more effective club.

As Adventurer Club director, you will be ministering to children in grades one through four. These young “Christians-in-training” are active, fun-loving, little people who have the capacity to truly love Jesus. As you discover the needs of the children and families in your church and community, you will acquire a vision of what the Lord wants to do through your Adventurer Club. You will seek to bring together staff and programming to help the children become more closely acquainted with the love of Jesus and His plans for them. This will help them acquire the habits, skills, and knowledge to live for Him in today’s world. God has ordained parents to be their primary spiritual leaders, and you will seek to include and support them in every way you can through the Adventurer Club.

Background Check and Online Child Safety Training:
Anyone working in Children’s ministries at Cicero Church is required to complete Shield the Vulnerable which is a background check and an online training seminar (approx. 45-60 minutes to complete) before assuming role. You may contact church office or pastoral staff to arrange for training.

Time Commitment:
Time will vary depending on programming and staff.

Resource Materials:
The following resources are recommended for your ministry. You can purchase these by calling AdventSource (800-328-0525), the Adventist Book Center (800-765-6955) or your local Christian bookstore.

Adventurer Activity Books and Parent Manuals are for each grade level. They contain activity sheets for both the child and adult to complete each of the curriculum activities required for earning the Adventurer class pin.

Come Meet Jesus Video Series. These videos were used during NET “98 and Net “99 and would be great for Adventurer Club activities, children’s church, children’s Sabbath School, or places where children need to be entertained during adult meetings.

How to Help Your Child Really Love Jesus, by Donna Habenicht. A child development specialist explains how children develop spiritually and offers practical suggestions on how you can help children establish a lasting friendship with God.

Margie Asks, Why Do People Have to Die? by Laura Rocke Winn. The great controversy and the state of the dead are both covered in this delightful story book for ages six through nine.

The Adventurer Staff Manual is the main resource for directing the Adventurer Club. A section on club organization contains all the information you need to start a club, plan activities and schedules, and organize staff. It describes the Adventurer uniform, and gives information on many other aspects of club organization. Pins, patches, certificates, uniforms, and awards described in the manual are all available through your local conference Adventurer office.

Your local library, school, and bookstore have materials for you to borrow or purchase which may help in running the various aspects of your club.

Visit AdventSource On-Line at www.adventsource.org/adventurer for a complete list of the latest resources available for local church leaders. You can place an order or request a catalog by calling 1-800-328-0525.

For information about additional resources and answers to your questions call the Adventist Plusline at 1-800-732-7587 or visit them on-line at www.plusline.org.

Clerk

God asks the church to be a community of people sharing a common purpose and fellowship, continually growing in faith and in the knowledge of the Son of God. It is “his body, the fullness of him who filleth everything in every way” (Eph. 1:22).

God calls us into His body for the purpose of establishing us in a saving relationship with Him and bring us into community with one another. The Holy Spirit convicts our minds, leads us to repentance, and plants us within the church.

You experience the presence of Jesus Christ in the world within your church; the world experiences the living presence of Jesus Christ as it witnesses your church. When a local church serves the world it is an expression of the love of Christ to the world. It is the body of Christ serving the world’s needs and being used by the Spirit as an agency of salvation. Thus the church is a servant body. Created for service, it serves the Lord in praise, serves one another in love, and serves the world in humility. “For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them” (Eph. 2:10).

Our priesthood is to each other within the church and to the world. The clerk, like every other church officer, is a ministering servant of God. Every Christian believer is called to ministry, gifted by the Holy Spirit, and in baptism ordained for ministry (Eph. 4:11-12).

Duties of the Church Clerk:
Although the role varies somewhat from church to church, the ministry to which a person is called when he or she becomes a church clerk involves the following:

  1. Secretary church board and business meetings. Although a church secretary sometimes is delegated this responsibility, it is the duty of the clerk to see that this task is performed and properly entered in the church records. The official copy of the minutes should include complete copies of all reports, documents and financial statements. It is a public record which any church member or denominational representative can look at.
  2. Church membership.  There must always be a vote by the church, not just the church board, to add or drop a name from the church membership roll, except in the case of the death of a member. The clerk handles the correspondence between the individuals seeking transfers and the churches with which the transfer is being made. The clerk also fills out a certificate and report forms when a person is baptized or makes a profession of faith. In cooperation with the Sabbath School teachers, you should take a keen interest in keeping track of each member, making note of those who do not attend regularly and those who are absent. When a member moves away, the church clerk should try to keep in touch with them and promptly contact the pastor in the new district to have him visit them and encourage them to transfer to a new church home.
  3. Church records. All church records, minutes of business meetings and board meetings, the church officer list, and the list of church members are maintained by the church clerk. This information is not only for the sake of the church family but portions of this information are also sent on special forms to the local conference office for its use in statistical reports. Also, it is vital that you supply copies of these records to new pastors and church board members so they have the information needed for their work.
  4. List of committees. The clerk should make note of any committees that are appointed and give the chairman of the group a list of the members making up the committee, along with an outline of the work the committee is being asked to accomplish.
  5. Church directory..It is the responsibility of the clerk to have an updated church directory produced as needed. This may be printed, photocopied, or produced for the church by one of the companies that makes photo directories. It should include non-member spouses and unbaptized children from church-related households, as well as regular attendees not yet baptized. It is well to include a statement that “this is not an official membership list.” Its purpose is to facilitate friendship in the congregation.

Appropriate Spiritual Gifts:

  • Helps The clerk, as keeper of church records is a source of information on many items and is a great help in supplying statistics, history, and church procedures.
  • Energy This provides the clerk with a gift that enables them to be “not slothful in business” as they serve the Lord.
  • Orderliness The ability to keep orderly records and submit reports in a timely manner.

Time Commitment:
One to two hours per week.

Communications Director and Team

Media Relations

As Director and/or Team member your objective is to raise public awareness of our church—its members, its mission, and its message; work to get church activities and events noted in the media; and help to get the church’s views included in the news adequately and accurately.

To do this effectively, the Director/Team members will:

  1. Report church activities to local radio, television, and newspapers by submitting news releases and public service announcements, arranging for interviews, writing letters to the editor on matters of concern to the church, writing or assigning feature stories or columns, arranging for photo coverage of congregational activities or events, and serving as a source of information for public media representatives.
  2. Look for opportunities, story ideas, and current issues that concern your church and community.
  3. Seek to become personally acquainted with newspaper editors, broadcast assignment editors, religion reporters, and community relations personnel.
  4. Develop initial contacts with press kits, nurture contacts with phone calls, and follow up contacts with hand-written note cards.

News and Information
It’s vital to keep church members informed about upcoming activities, and equally important to share church news with conference communication directors and the larger Adventist family. To do this effectively, Director/Team members will:

  1. Write articles about upcoming events and maintain church calendar on church website.
  2. Submit articles and photos to conference communication director for conference
    newsletters or sections in union papers.
  3. Maintain an attractive bulletin board in the church lobby highlighting church activities, news, photos, and developments.

Appropriate Spiritual Gifts:

  • Writing
  • Organization

Time Commitment:
The Communications Director/Team members will need to devote at least 2-3 hours per month to inform the church/community/conference of church activities.

Deacon

As Jesus gives insight into the nature of His Church using the symbol of the body in 1 Corinthians 12, so it is that when we join the Church we become “members” of the body of Christ and are equipped for specific functions by the Holy Spirit. God wills that the various “body parts” (members) function effectively toward the common goal of the Church; making disciples of Jesus Christ.

It is an erroneous concept that the clergy have a “sacred calling” and the general membership only a “secular calling.” This concept impedes the progress of the church by leading some to believe their contributions are less important. In fact, the New Testament teaches that all members of the body of Christ are ministers of Jesus Christ. There are necessary differences in function, but the status of all leaders is the same.

You have been asked to serve as a deacon in the church. The God who calls is able to sustain you as you cooperate with Him.

Responsibilities:

  1. Report to Head/Assistant Deacon– Deacon will assist in maintaining the smooth operation of church meetings. Any needs and/or concerns should be reported to the Head Deacon as soon as possible so that they could be addressed in an adequate manner. Regular meetings are to be scheduled by the Head Deacon to address various issues and provide training.
  2. Head Deacon will schedule deacons to be on duty for any particular week.The assigned deacons will be responsible for the following items:
    • In the winter time, they will help with removing snow on sidewalks and main entryways.
    • After church services, they will do a walk through of the sanctuary where hymn and praise books are returned to the pew racks and loose papers are thrown in the trash.
    • Assist in collecting the offering during the worship service.
    • One deacon is designated as the lock-up deacon, and will be responsible for ensuring that the church is locked up and the building is secure after church service ends.
    • Set-up/tear-down tables for fellowship and other functions.
    • Remove trash from fellowship hall after potlucks.
    • Assist greeters in opening door and carrying food for members.
    • Escort guests/members to their cars as needed.
    • Walk through parking lot during church services, report suspicious activity to Head Deacon, Elder, 911 as appropriate.
  3. Assisting Elders in providing immediate assistance to needy individuals who approach the church for food, clothing, gas, etc.
  4. Assist with Baptisms
    • Filling the baptismal tank (requires coming to Church 30 minutes early)
    • Assist male candidates as they prepare for the baptism
  5. Assisting with the Communion Service.
    • Setting up rooms including chairs, tables, towels, water, and basins for foot washing
    • Restoring rooms after foot washing
    • Washing foot washing basins
    • Preparing Sanctuary for Communion Service
    • Serving ordinances
    • Assisting disabled members in getting to foot washing rooms
  6. Church maintenance
    • Workbees. Deacons will help when workbees are called for the church or school.
    • Identifying structural, mechanical, electrical, plumbing, and cosmetic problems, and reporting them to the Head Deacon. Assisting with repairs or organizing work bees for smaller projects.
  7. Visitation
    • Available for visitation ministry to church members who are shut-in, sick, etc. This will be especially true during times of communion.
    • It is appropriate for either deacons or deaconesses, who have been ordained, to assist in distributing the emblems and uncovering and recovering the table during the service.
  • Appropriate Spiritual Gifts:
    • Helps or Service – The ability to unselfishly meet the needs of others through practical help.
    • Administration – The ability to organize and manage, working with and through others to achieve goals.
    • Mercy – The capacity to feel sympathy with those in need and to manifest this sympathy in some practical way with a cheerful spirit.
    • Head Deacon/Deaconess will also manifest the gift of leadership – the ability to help others set goals and communicate these goals to others. Deacons/Deaconesses will work harmoniously together.

Time Commitment:
Including Sabbath duty, most deacons will need to plan on two hours per week to carry out their duties. Another 1-2 hours a month are needed for visitation and special projects. Head deacon will serve on the Church board.

Deaconess

As Jesus gives insight into the nature of His Church using the symbol of the body in 1 Corinthians 12, so it is that when we join the Church we become “members” of the body of Christ and are equipped for specific functions by the Holy Spirit. God wills that the various “body parts” (members) function effectively toward the common goal of the Church; making disciples of Jesus Christ.

It is an erroneous concept that the clergy have a “sacred calling” and the general membership only a “secular calling.” This concept impedes the progress of the church by leading some to believe their contributions are less important. In fact, the New Testament teaches that all members of the body of Christ are ministers of Jesus Christ. There are necessary differences in function, but the status of all leaders is the same.

You have been asked to serve as a deaconess in the church. The God who calls is able to sustain you as you cooperate with Him.

Duties of the Deaconess 
The ministry to which a person is called when she becomes a deaconess includes the following duties:

  1. Report to Head Deaconess. Deaconess will assist in maintaining the smooth operation of church meetings. Any needs and/or concerns should be reported to the Head Deaconess as soon as possible so that they could be addressed in an adequate manner. A quarterly meeting is to be scheduled by the Head Deaconess to address various issues and provide training.
  2. Head Deaconess will coordinate fellowship meals. The assigned deaconesses will be responsible for the following items:
    1. Warm-up and serve food for fellowship dinners.
    2. They will make sure that the tables are covered with tablecloths.
    3. They will ensure that the dishes are washed and the kitchen is clean after everyone is finished.
  3. Visitation. Head Deaconess will coordinate deaconesses (and other interested church members) to provide card and visitation ministry to church members who are shut-in, sick, etc.
  4. Workbees. Deaconesses will help when cleaning workbees are called for the church or school.
  5. Assisting with the Baptismal Ceremony. The traditional roles for this service are described below:
    1. The deacons will:
      • Prepare and fill the pool.
      • Assist male candidates as they prepare for the baptism.
    2. The deaconesses will:
      • Prepare the robes for all who are participating.
      • Assist female candidates.
      • Launder and store robes, towels, etc., after the ceremony.
  6. Assisting with the Communion Service. The traditional roles for this service are described below.
    1. The deacons will:
      • Provide the physical arrangements, such as placing the communion table.
      • Place the towels, basins and water in the appropriate rooms for use in the Ordinance of Humility.
      • Dispense water and basins for the men during the Ordinance of Humility, giving particular attention to visitors and new members.
    2. The deaconesses will:
      • Prepare the bread and grape juice.
      • Arrange the emblems and covering on the table.
      • Dispense water and basins for the women during the Ordinance of Humility, giving attention and assistance to visitors, new members, and the aged.
      • Clean and store the linens and serving pieces used in Communion.
    3. It is appropriate for either deacons or deaconesses, who have been ordained, to assist in distributing the emblems and removing/placing back the communion tray covers during the service.
  • Caring for the Congregation. In many churches an unwritten tradition gives the women who serve as deaconesses the responsibility of preparing hot meals for any church family that experiences a death or other tragedy. This may mean simply taking food to the home or, in some cases, the serving of an entire meal to family and guests after a funeral. The funeral meal will be coordinated by the Head Deaconess.

Appropriate Spiritual Gifts:
Helps or Service. The ability to unselfishly meet the needs of others through practical help.

  • Adminstration. The ability to organize and manage, working with and through others to achieve goals.
  • Mercy. The capacity to feel sympathy with those in need and to manifest this sympathy in some practical way with a cheerful spirit.
  • Head Deacon/Deaconess will also manifest the gift of leadership. The ability to help others set goals and communicate these goals to others. Deacons/Deaconesses will work harmoniously together.

Time Commitment:
Including Sabbath duty, most deacons and deaconesses will need to plan on two hours per week to carry out their duties. Another 1-2 hours a month are needed for visitation and special projects.

Head deaconess is a member of the Church Board and will participate regularly in the monthly meetings in order to give input and counsel regarding church matters.

Elder

God asks the church to be a community of people sharing a common purpose and fellowship, continually growing in faith and in the knowledge of the Son of God. Paul describes the church as “. . . his body, the fullness of him who filleth every thing in every way” (Eph.1:22).

God calls us into His body for the purpose of establishing a saving relationship with Him and community with one another. The Holy Spirit convicts our minds, leads us to repentance, and plants us within the church.

The symbol of water baptism marks our entrance into the body of Christ and also marks the baptism of the Holy Spirit experienced by a new disciple. “I tell you the truth, unless a man is born of the water and the Spirit, He cannot enter the kingdom of God” (John 3:5). The Holy Spirit is the vital life force of the church. When you come to Christ, you are prepared by the Holy Spirit, who has already led you to repentance, for service.

When a church serves the world it is an expression of the love of Christ to the world. It is the body of Christ serving the world’s needs and being used by the Spirit as an agency of salvation. Thus, the church is a servant body. It was created for service. It serves the Lord in praise, serves one another in love, and serves the world in humility. “For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them” (Eph. 2:10).

God calls every member of the church into ministry. The church is a kingdom of priests set free to minister for Christ. Our priesthood is to each other within the church and to the world. An elder, like any other church officer, is a ministering servant of God. Every Christian believer is called to ministry, gifted by the Holy Spirit, and in baptism ordained for ministry (Eph. 4:11-12).

It was during the middle ages that the clergy became distinct from other members as a superior element in the church. The biblical concept of laity includes all believers as ministers in the body. In actuality, the church today still has a great distance to go before effectively applying this concept. You should view the work of an elder as a ministry to which God calls people; it is His will operating in their lives.

Duties of the Elder:

The ministry to which a person is called when he becomes an elder can best be described in the following ways:

  1. Visitation. The elder will be responsible for the spiritual nurture and care of those members in his parish. He will visit members in their homes for prayer and encouragement. He will also assist in giving Bible studies to prospective members.
  2. Worship services. The elder will lead the worship service as scheduled. He will review the order of service ahead of time to insure that all responsible parties are prepared and ready to serve.
  3. Preaching. The elder may be asked to preach when the pastor is out-of-town or not available.
  4. A Spiritual Mentor. The spiritual life of an elder should constantly lead members of the church to seek a deeper spiritual experience for themselves. I Timothy, chapter 3, describes the Christian life of an elder in these words: “. . . above reproach, the husband of one wife, temperate, prudent, respectable, hospitable, able to teach, not addicted to wine or pugnacious, but gentle. . .” An elder should model, by his or her devotional life, Christian personality and spiritual interest, a higher ideal for each member to reach. The elder should reflect the fruits of the Spirit in his or her relationship with others: love, joy, peace, longsuffering, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control.
  5. Church Administration. An elder should always attempt to make a positive contribution to the organization and progress of the church. While doing this, he or she should not try to dominate or control but rather enable others to participate in decision-making in the church and ministry. An elder often serves in an advisory capacity to various departments, committees, and projects.
    • An elder is a member of the church board and attends on a regular basis in order to provide input and counsel regarding church issues.
    • The board of elders will meet together with the pastor once per month for visioning, administration, prayer, and counsel. This is typically on the Sunday morning before the scheduled board meeting.

Appropriate Spiritual Gifts:

  • Exhortation – The special ability God gives some to bring encouragement and comfort to others.
  • Pastor/Shepherd – The ability to carry a personal responsibility for the spiritual welfare of a group of believers and act as a shepherd, overseer, protector, and guide to the church.
  • Administration – The ability to guide the church in meeting it’s goals.
  • Leadership – The ability to help others set goals and communicate these goals to others.

Time Commitment:
Including Sabbath duty, most elders will need to plan on two to four hours per week to carry out their duties.

Head Greeter and Greeters

When a person steps into a church for the first time, he or she evaluates the atmosphere. He asks himself: “Will they accept me? Will it be easy to make friends? Will my spiritual and personal needs be met? Will it be easy to find my way around? Will my family like it here?”

The newcomer will quickly come to some conclusions during the first few minutes. First impressions are often lasting impressions. Consequently, the ministry of the greeters is one of the most important things that happens in any congregation! Sometimes it is called “foyer ministry.”

Although a greeter’s love should be no stronger than is the love found in the rest of the body of Christ, nevertheless the greeter performs a major role in ensuring that people see and experience that love. In Christ, you have received God’s unconditional love, and, in Christ, you are called to extend that same unconditional love to others. The ministry of greeting is perhaps one of the most crucial in the church because it is one of the most visible. It is a ministry vital to the saving work of the church.

Duties of the Head Greeter:
Scheduling and coordinating all greeter activities.

Duties of Greeter:

  • Welcomes those entering the building for Sabbath services and/or church events.
  • The goal is to make each person who enters know that he or she is welcome here, feel as comfortable as possible, and receive what information they might need. Tasks include:
    1. Greeting and opening doors
    2. Giving out bulletins and welcome packets
    3. Assisting visitors in filling out registration cards
    4. Being warm and friendly, yet perceptive of each person’s differing comfort levels. A happy face and cheerful countenance is essential.

Appropriate Spiritual Gifts:

  • Hospitality
  • Helps
  • Discernment

Time Commitment:
On assigned Sabbaths, the greeter will arrive no later than 9:15 AM for Sabbath School and 10:30 AM for church services.

Health Ministries Leader and Assistants

Health ministries are an integral part of the mission of the Adventist Church. “Whether therefore ye eat, or drink, or whatsoever ye do, do all to the glory of God” (I Cor. 10:31). Health ministry is the gospel of Christ illustrated, the message of God practiced. Without it, the gospel witness is muted; it is merely a theory, an idea.

The most important objective of health ministry is to help men and women reach their full potential, mentally, spiritually and physically. To reach full potential, health principles must be practiced.

The more closely these principles are followed, the better health the person enjoys. The more active a church is in public health education, the more effective will be its public evangelism, for health is the most universal entering wedge.

Duties of the Health Ministries Leader & Assistants:
The ministry to which a person is called when he or she becomes the Health Ministries Leader & Assistants can be described in the following ways:

  1. Health promotion. Keeping church members aware of the importance of health and educating new members on the significance of health and temperance is one of the major responsibilities of the Health Ministries Leader and Assistants. One way to promote good health is by submitting articles for the church website as well as sharing health nuggets during announcement time at least once per quarter.
  2. Plan & lead out Health & Temperance Sabbath during the next year. This will be coordinated and scheduled with the pastor. They will prepare and speak on the subject on healthy living(or invite guest speakers) and challenge the church to improve their lifestyle.
  3. Plan and lead out annual Health Promotion events such as CHIP, Creation Health, Depression Recovery, Health Fair, etc. for community. Services may include nutrition, heart disease, stress management, cancer prevention, physical fitness, weight control and the Bible basis for healthful living, as well as screening projects for high blood pressure, coronary heart disease and other health problems.

Time Commitment:
Health Ministries Leader and Assistants will spend 1-3 hours per month depending on the amount of programming and promotion.

Men’s Ministry Coordinator

As few as ten years ago, many had not realized the need for ministries that were for a particular gender. Today, most Adventists are aware of, are involved in, or support a gender-based ministry, with women’s ministry leading the way. Nevertheless, the men’s ministry director also fills an important role in the church, in that he works to encourage, lead, and nurture men who serve as brothers, husbands, fathers, and ministry leaders. The director is responsible for organizing, planning, and directing programs that will meet the unique spiritual and emotional needs of the men of the church.

The men’s ministry has often been chased by the big-screen TV and Super Bowl stereotype. It is your duty to lead the men of your church, as well as their families and the church-at-large to a new understanding. The men of your church need to come away from the men’s ministry gatherings better equipped to serve the church, their families, and each other. “For you have been called to live in freedom–not freedom to satisfy your sinful nature, but freedom to serve one another in love” (Gal. 5:13, New Living Translation).

Duties of the Men’s Ministry Coordinator and Committee:

  • Develop and conduct on a periodic basis a wide variety of programs and activities that will meet the various contemporary needs of a diverse male constituency.
  • Encourage and facilitate meaningful spiritual, mental, and emotional growth among the men of the church.
  • Work with the small group committee to develop groups centering around the needs of men.
  • Plan a Men’s Ministry worship service once per year which especially addresses the needs of men. This will need to be coordinated with the pastor several months in advance.
  • Communicate with the board and pastor when scheduling programs.
  • Serve as a communicator of news of interest to men that is disseminated from the division, union, and conference men’s ministries programs.

Spiritual Gifts Desired:

  • Encouragement
  • Administration
  • Shepherding

Resource Materials
The following resources are recommended for your ministry. You can purchase these by calling AdventSource (800-328-0525), the Adventist Book Center (800-765-6955) or your local Christian bookstore.

  • 600 Minutes With God, Dick Duerksen/Ray Dabrowski, eds, AdvenTalk Media. 200 (3-minute) devotionals written by Christian men for Christian men. Personal, direct, humorous and pointed. Each page will challenge you in your personal Christian growth.
  • Expect Great Things: How to Be a Happy, Growing Christian, by Richard O’Ffill. A template for successful Christian living, with the goal of being like Jesus.
  • Follow Me: How to Walk With Jesus, by Miraslov Kis. With sensitive sketches of people whose lives were transformed when they met Jesus, the author gives us new eyes, and then explores the implications of following Jesus.
  • Leap Over A Wall, by Eugene Peterson. Through the story of David, Peterson suggests new and powerful possibilities for how you can live as God’s best friend today.
  • Temptations Men Face, by Tom L. Eisenman. Straightforward talk on money, affairs, perfectionism and insensitivity. How do men experience common temptations and what can be done about them? Insights into a man’s perspective on these and other tough issues.
  • Then Men Think Private Thoughts, by Gordon McDonald. If you have ever questioned your personal value, wondered how God can use you better, tried to evaluate your success as father or husband, this book will encourage you. McDonald, with almost painful honesty, shows how to peel away your selfishness and see what God is eager to do in you.

Website

  • The North American Division Men’s Ministry site (www.emale.org) has information on how to start a men’s ministry group, offers confidential counseling, and lists resources for men and ministry leaders.
  • Visit AdventSource On-Line at www.adventsource.org for a complete list of the latest resources available for local church leaders. You can place an order or request a catalog by calling 1-800-328-0525.
  • For information about additional resources and answers to your questions call the Adventist Plusline at 1-800-732-7587 or visit them on-line at www.plusline.org.

Pathfinder Club Director and Assistants

Duties:

There are various elements that make up the Pathfinder Club program. The main ones are listed below.

  1. Programming. A large share of the Pathfinder Club’s time is involved in organizing Pathfinder Club programming. These include a wide variety of activities such as regular club meetings, Pathfinder Sabbath each year, social events, campouts, and outreach projects. The programming of the Pathfinder Club is designed to provide varied and interesting opportunities for children. The goal is to lead each child to a relationship with Jesus.
  2. Planning. The Pathfinder director develops a yearly calendar of activities and a budget. The Pathfinder Club staff gets involved by giving suggestions that might improve and expand on the ideas already presented. Major plans must pass the approval of the church board and it must coordinate with the program of the local conference.
  3. Recruiting and supervising. The Pathfinder director is responsible for recruiting staff to help with club activities. The Pathfinder Club staff is made up of volunteers: adults and youth. All staff are under the supervision of the Pathfinder director.
  4. Teaching. The Pathfinder director assists the young people in learning outdoor skills; developing spiritual values (which of course is of prime importance to us as a church), and serving in ways which could be beneficial in saving lives in their communities. Crafts are always an enjoyable part of the meetings and the Pathfinder director should be right there (along with her or his staff) to answer any questions pertaining to completing various projects assigned.
  5. Listening to parents and children. The effective Pathfinder director enjoys young people and can relate to them in a way that makes them feel comfortable around him. He or she should let them know by their actions and words that he/she is their friend and is there to listen to them when they have any problems, especially those of a spiritual nature.
  6. Communication. The Pathfinder director should make sure the children, parents and the entire church are made aware that there is a viable Pathfinder Club. The program should be promoted in all departments since there are areas of interest to all ages.

Background Check and Online Child Safety Training:
Anyone working in Children’s ministries at Cicero Church is required to complete Shield the Vulnerable which is a background check and an online training seminar (approx. 45-60 minutes to complete) before assuming role. You may contact church office or pastoral staff to arrange for training.

Time Commitment:
Time will vary depending on the programming and amount of help.

Resource Materials:

  1. AY Class Instructors Manual. Requirements and teacher helps for Friend, Companion, Explorer, Ranger, Voyager and Guide classwork.
  2. Honors Handbook. Requirements for all honors.
  3. Pathfinder Staff Manual. Complete operating guide for your Pathfinder club.
  4. We Are the Pathfinders Strong, by Willie Oliver with Pat Humphrey. Illustrated history of Pathfindering.

Prayer Warrior Team Leader & Members

The Prayer Team Coordinator will be responsible for:

  1. Developing and organizing a way to intentionally pray for the needs of the church and community. Pastor/ Elders/Church members will submit prayer requests of individuals who have given permission to be placed on the prayer list. The coordinator will then distribute prayer requests among the prayer team(s).
  2. Communicating with prayer team(s) and church as prayers are answered.
  3. Maintaining strict confidentiality in regards to information given.
  4. Plan prayer vigils at church.

The Prayer Team Member will be responsible for:

  1. Praying for those who have asked for prayer on a regular daily basis.
  2. Working with the prayer team coordinator as program is developed.
  3. Maintaining strict confidentiality in regards to information given.

Religious Liberty Leader

To worship God according to conscience and to share Christ’s love are cherished freedoms not universally enjoyed. The government of God is based on freedom of choice. God chose to create humanity also with the power of choice. “See, I have set before thee this day life and good, and death and evil . . . blessing and cursing: therefore choose life, that both thou and thy seed may live” (Deut 30:15, 19).

Free exercise of religion is like a fragile flower; it must receive the most vigorous protection possible and the most gentle care to be found. Within it, freedom of conscience thrives or is throttled. Revelation 13 points to a political power that will arise in the last days causing people to “worship” another religion-political power. Religion and politics are symbolized in Revelation 17 by an apostate church being sustained by the government. The persecuting power of this union of church and state is illustrated by the woman who becomes drunk with the blood of the saints.

What, then, are we to do about threats to religious freedom? Ellen White says, “It is our duty to do all in our power to avert the threatened danger. We should endeavor to disarm prejudice by placing ourselves in a proper light before the people. We should bring before them the real question at issue, thus interposing the most effectual protest against measures to restrict liberty of conscience” (Testimonies for the Church, Vol. 5, page 452).

Duties of the Religious Liberty Leader
The ministry to which a person is called when he or she becomes a religious liberty leader can best be described in the following ways:

  1. Promote Liberty magazine. Help your pastor conduct the religious liberty campaign in your church. Set an example by your wholehearted support. Then encourage church members to subscribe to Liberty for themselves and give generously to send the magazine to community, state or province, and national officials and thought leaders.
  2. Communication. Provide religious liberty news through announcements. Leader can plan on having 5 minutes during personal ministries time once per quarter to give oral reports of current developments. He or she also becomes the eyes and ears for the conference and union public affairs and religious liberty directors by bringing significant items to their attention.
  3. Get acquainted with public officials. Know the state or provincial government leaders and national legislators from your area. Write to them when religious liberty issues arise. Let them know what your religious liberty concerns are in a respectful, dignified manner as befits the cause of Christ. When religious liberty issues arise, you may be asked to encourage church members to write letters to state, provincial, or national leaders, but consult with your union Public Affairs and Religious Liberty (PARL) director before writing or contacting public officials in the name of the church.
  4. Give recognition to civic leaders. When a civic official in your community takes a strong stand on upholding religious liberty, contact your union conference PARL director for assistance in recognizing the official by presenting an appropriate plaque or award at the church or in the official’s office.
  5. Community relations. Become involved in the local community. Keep a current name and address file of city and county officials including council members. Get acquainted with your city and county public servants and be sure they receive Liberty magazine. Attend their meetings to become better acquainted with the problems in your community. Keep your pastor and conference PARL director informed about major developments in your community that could affect religious freedom. Help to organize local contacts when asked to do so by your pastor or conference PARL director.
  6. Help church members. Watch for religious liberty problems among church members. Some members, especially new ones, are not aware that assistance is available to them as they face Sabbath employment problems or problems with labor unions.

Time Commitment:
The amount of time required for religious liberty issues will vary. The leader will need to plan on four to five hours per month to carry out his or her duties.

Resource Materials
The following materials are available either from your local or union conference office:

  1. Contacting Your Legislator—A pamphlet with ideas for communicating with government officials. In it are suggestions for personal contacts as well as correspondence.
  2. Guidelines on Religious Discrimination—A reprint from the Federal Register. In 1980, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission published guidelines to help workers and employers find accommodations for religious observations and practices. These guidelines, although not a part of the Civil Rights Act, carry heavy weight in the courts when religious accommodation is being contested.
  3. Sabbath Problem Kit for Church Members—An aid for members with Sabbath work problems. This kit contains do’s and don’ts as well as sample letters which members can use as guides when writing to their employers. Members should use this kit in conjunction with material that has been given to their pastor.
  4. Visit AdventSource On-Line at www.adventsource.org for a complete list of the latest resources available for local church leaders. You can place an order or request a catalog by calling 1-800-328-0525.

Sabbath School Secretary and Assistants

  1. Ordering materials such as quarterlies, program helps, mission DVDs, etc. for Adult and Children’s Sabbath School classes. The Sabbath Secretary will consult with Superintendents and Division leaders on a regular basis to determine accurate amounts of materials to order.
  2. Distributing materials to leaders and teachers. It is the responsibility of the Sabbath School Secretary to see that these items are ordered in advance of need, received, stored carefully, and distributed on time.
  3. Attending Adult and Children’s Sabbath School council meetings which are scheduled quarterly.
  4. Collecting Sabbath School offerings.
  5. Keeping a record of Sabbath school attendance. Each Sabbath school teacher and division leader is to be supplied with a membership record folder and encouraged to keep a list of people in the group. These form the basis for filling out the Sabbath school profile which is the official statistical report of the Sabbath School in our church.

Time Commitment:
He or she will spend 1 hour per week in serving as Sabbath School Secretary.

Sabbath School Superintendent & Assistants

The purpose of the Sabbath School is to make disciples for Christ. It includes the nurture of spiritual growth in members and prospective members, as well as the unchurched who come to join in the fellowship, study, sharing and service. The Sabbath School exists not only to minister to its members, but to train those members to minister to others. The Sabbath School is a school of Christian living, not just an event on Sabbath mornings. It can include Bible study groups that meet at other times also. Its purpose is evangelistic, not ritualistic.

In Acts 2:42-47 the Bible gives us a blueprint for the Sabbath School. Verse 42 outlines the goals of the Sabbath School as “teaching and fellowship,” and “breaking bread and prayer.” Verses 43-45 illustrate the strong sense of togetherness, caring and support that must be present in the Sabbath School in order to create a proper atmosphere for learning and growth.

Duties:

  1. Supervises overall Sabbath school program from 9:20-10:45 AM.
  2. Prepares a short program in sanctuary each week that is spiritually uplifting from 9:20-9:45 AM.
  3. Reports issues to SS council as need arises.
  4. Meets with Sabbath School council at the beginning of term to select new Adult Sabbath School teachers. The Council will also meet to fill any vacancies that arise during year. (MMT is not responsible for filling vacancies for Adult Sabbath School teachers.)
  5. Meets quarterly with all Adult and Children’s Sabbath School leaders in order to evaluate the effectiveness of their division (programs, classes, etc.).
  6. Plans special programs at least once per quarter on the themes of Thanksgiving, Christmas, Children SS, etc.
  7. Coordinates flowers for Mother’s Day, bread for Father’s Day, and one picnic in summer.
  8. Advises the SS secretary on orders for SS materials such as quarterlies, program helps, mission dvds, etc.
  9. Fills in for Children’s SS classes when necessary (Superintendent).
  10. Encourages nurturing of class members. They will encourage each of the class participants to provide care and support for those in their classes. Class members will be asked to write, call, or visit those who have been missing.

Background Check and Online Child Safety Training(for Superintendent):
Anyone working in Children’s ministries at Cicero Church is required to complete Shield the Vulnerable which is a background check and an online training seminar (approx. 45-60 minutes to complete) before assuming role. You may contact church office or pastoral staff to arrange for training (Superintendent only).

Appropriate Spiritual Gifts:

  • Leadership
  • Organization

Time Commitment:

The Adult Sabbath School Superintendent/Assistant will need to devote at least 90 minutes per week in organizing the SS program. Superintendent will also serve on the Church Board which meets monthly.

Social Committee

God asks the church to be a community of people sharing a common purpose and fellowship, continually growing in faith and in the knowledge of the Son of God. Paul describes the church as “his body, the fullness of him who filleth every thing in every way” (Eph. 1:22).

Thus the church is a servant body. Created for service, it serves the Lord in praise, serves one another in love, and serves the world in humility. “For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them” (Eph. 2:10).

Shortly after Pentecost, the gift of sharing with those who have not, otherwise known as the gift of hospitality (Rom. 12:13; I Tim. 3:2; I Peter 4:9), was first exercised specifically for the body of Christ and the world Christ died to save. As the believers praised God in this fellowship, they had favor with people. Their love for one another attracted those who observed their fellowship and “the Lord added to the church daily such as should be saved” (Acts 2:47). These new converts did not all have wealth; consequently, these new believers met together in one another’s homes, pooled their resources and shared what they had with those who possessed little or nothing.

God supplies each person in the church with the resources for ministry—scripture, spiritual power, God’s character, and spiritual gifts. The members of the social committee are equipped for their ministry by the gifts received from the Holy Spirit. These spiritual gifts are special abilities given by the Holy Spirit to make their ministry effective and build up the body of Christ.

Duties of the Social Committee

The ministry of the social committee can best be described in the following ways:

  1. Scheduling.
    Schedule church socials at least on a quarterly basis.
  2. Planning.
    It is important to plan well ahead. In today’s world many church members have busy, packed schedules and if they do not have advance knowledge of an event for several weeks, they will not be able to attend. It is also true that to produce an excellent activity that makes people feel good about their church family and really enjoy themselves, it takes time for careful preparation.
  3. Hosts and hostesses.
    Do not forget that the most important element in any church social is the people. Committee members should be assigned to serve as hosts and hostesses for each event, and those with this assignment should be freed of details like preparing food, setting up tables and chairs, etc., so they can concentrate on greeting each person as he or she arrives, introducing those who do not know one another very well, watching the flow of conversation so that no one is left out, and generally supervising the relational elements of the activity. These little communication tasks are sometimes ignored and as a result new people in the group feel uncomfortable and unwelcome.
  4. Details and arrangements.
    Each event requires a lot of errands, purchases of supplies, setup of furniture and equipment, creation of decorations and handouts, and many other preparations. The members of the social committee are all expected to share in these tasks, and it will destroy the value of the event if some one on the committee has to carry an undue share of the burden. It is essential that the coordinator assigned to each event make up a detailed check-list well in advance and assign each item to someone on the committee. Then check regularly on their progress, or you will be embarrassed!
  5. Recruiting and managing volunteers.
    The crew that does the work at any church social is made up of volunteers, not paid employees. It has to be recruited and supervised with the utmost care. Successful social committee chairpersons are those who learn how to see that volunteers “get paid” not with money, but with friendship, a sense of usefulness, opportunities for creativity and the joy of seeing church members come closer together and enjoy times of real fellowship.
  6. Creativity.
    The congregation has a right to expect the social committee will plan and produce events that have a touch of beauty, quality and creativity. A sense of “specialness” must touch each freshly baked roll, bowl of fruit, decorative flower display, and linen tablecloth, as well as the high school photos of the honored guests mounted on the bulletin board or the favorite hymn of the new pastor sung by the guest musician, or whatever item is appropriate! Remember that our God is the creator of all that is spectacular and winsome in the world around us and that He wants us to share with Him the joy of the exquisite. It takes a little extra thinking and effort to come up with these special touches, but it is worth it because it tells those who participate that your congregation cares.

Appropriate Gifts:

  • Administration
  • Hospitality
  • Love

Time Commitment:
The time will vary. Team will need to devote at least 2-3 hours per month in planning and preparing socials.

Resource Materials:
Visit AdventSource On-Line at www.adventsource.org for a complete list of the latest resources available for local church leaders. You can place an order or request a catalog by calling 1-800-328-0525.

Telephone Coordinator and Committee

The Telephone Coordinator will be responsible for:

Developing and organizing a way for the Telephone Committee to call the church members in a timely manner. Pastoral staff or church office will contact Telephone Coordinator when there is a funeral, serious illness, emergency, or special circumstance that the entire church family needs to know.

The Telephone Committee will be responsible for:

  1. Assisting the Telephone Coordinator in calling the church family as the need arises.
  2. A designated committee member will assume the role of Coordinator when he or she is not available or out-of-town.

Time Commitment:
Telephone committee will spend approximately 1 hour per month calling church members when the need arises.

Treasurer and Assistants

Finances are an integral part of the ministry of the laity. Local church finances are handled by a member of the congregation with business skills elected to the important responsibility of church treasurer.

The history of church treasurers goes back at least to 457 B.C. when Ezra appointed guardians for the funds given for the work in Jerusalem. To those given the care of the Lord’s goods Ezra commanded, “Ye are holy unto the Lord; the vessels are holy also; and the silver and the gold are a freewill offering unto the Lord God of your fathers” Ezra 8:28.

“The care exercised by Ezra in providing for the transportation and safety of the Lord’s treasure, teaches a lesson worthy of thoughtful study. Only those whose trustworthiness had been proved, were chosen; and they were instructed plainly regarding the responsibility resting on them. In the appointment of faithful officers to act as treasurers of the Lord’s goods, Ezra recognized the necessity and value of order and organization in connection with the work of God” (Prophets and Kings, page 617).

Jesus and His traveling band of disciples also had one designated to take charge of their funds. Jesus taught the importance of the proper management and integrity in the handling of monies.

If it was important in the days of Ezra and of Christ to have someone to take care of church funds, it is essential today.

The work of the church treasurer is sometimes not recognized as a ministry because it is done behind the scenes. Nevertheless, it is a specialized, vital ministry in which the treasurer exercises his or her spiritual gifts. The whole congregation benefits indirectly from the work of the treasurer.

Duties of the Church Treasurer
The duties of the ministry to which a person is called when he or she becomes a church treasurer can best be described in the following ways:

  1. Tithes and offerings. The treasurer receives the tithes and offerings which come in on Sabbath morning or to the church office during the week. It is a generally accepted safeguard to have two or more count the loose offerings as soon as possible after they have been received before the money is turned over to the treasurer. Ideally, the church will make provision for the safekeeping of the church monies in a safe in the church office or arranging to use a bank deposit box.
  2. Receipting. All funds received should be receipted as soon as possible. The offering envelopes are opened and checked to see that each amount received tallies with what is written on the envelope. All the receipts are then posted in the church ledger by computer. The keeping of these records is vital not only for the auditor who will be checking them each year, but for the members as well, who may need a list of their contributions.
  3. Banking. It is the responsibility of the treasurer to deposit church monies in a local bank. Of course, this must be in a separate account from that of the church treasurer’s personal account. The account should be opened in the name of the local church according the requirements of national and local law.
  4. Records. The treasurer needs to forward a copy of the church ledger pages to the conference each month. This list of the month’s receipts should be accompanied by a check covering the amount of tithe given and the offerings received that were designated for the conference, union, or General Conference projects.
  5. Personal receipts. The receipts for tithes and offerings given by the members should be distributed to them on a regular basis in the manner the local church has agreed upon. Some churches do this quarterly while others have worked out a system to mail them out on a yearly basis. There is no strict rule for this procedure.
  6. Accounts payable. Authorization for the disbursing of church funds for church operation is generally given in the annual church budget. Special projects or items not in the budget must be authorized by the church board or by a church business meeting.
  7. Financial statements. The treasurer should prepare a monthly financial statement and distribute copies to the church board at their meeting. This statement should include the balance status of all budgeted accounts, as well as the totals received in tithes and offerings and a detailed record of all disbursements made.

Appropriate Spiritual Gifts:

  • Administration- (Combined with business and financial skills will greatly benefit a church)
  • Faith
  • Giving
  • Wisdom

Confidentiality:
Strict Confidentiality is essential for the work of the church treasurer. Those who give monies to the church have a legal and moral right to have their confidentiality protected. The treasurer should never comment to others regarding the tithes, offerings, or income of any member, except those who are authorized to see the ledger.

Time Commitment:
Depending on the size of the congregation and how many assistants are available, it may involve 10-15 hours per week.

Vacation Bible School Leader (VBS)

Vacation Bible School Leader and Assistants

The Vacation Bible School leader plays a key role in directing the church’s largest outreach program for children and their families and has the following responsibilities:

  1. Recruits and screens volunteers.
  2. Works with Sabbath School counsel to develop a VBS budget.
  3. Identifies and purchases materials for VBS.
  4. Plans the VBS space—which rooms of the church will be used and for what.
  5. Plans the VBS time—the date, time of day, and program schedule.
  6. Leads the team in follow-up events.
  7. Coordination of the Vacation Bible School.
    • Delegates leadership of the learning stations to able and responsible leaders; holds them accountable (stations include Bible learning, craft, games, etc).
  8. Makes routine staff assignments, as follows:
    • Drama ministry—training a small team to do skits for the general session.
    • Guiding ministry—training and mentoring teen and adult guides who are each assigned a group of five students to accompany throughout VBS (guides and assists station leaders when asked, but does not teach).
    • Music ministry—learning VBS songs, leading the singing at VBS and follow-up events.
    • Publicity ministry—communicating and publicizing VBS at church and in the media.
  9. Registration and record keeping—maintaining and updating student files, name tags.
  10. Welcoming ministry—greeting, finding name tags, showing where to go.
  11. Optional—safety patrol, videographer, medical, custodial, parenting seminar, photographer.

Background Check and On-line Child Safety training:
Anyone working in Children’s ministries at Cicero Church is required to complete Shield the Vulnerable which is a background check and an online training seminar (approx. 45-60 minutes to complete) before assuming role. You may contact church office or pastoral staff to arrange for training

Appropriate Spiritual Gifts:

  • An attitude of servant leadership.
  • A passion for children and children’s ministries.
  • Leadership experience in a ministry to children.

Time Commitment: 
10-15 hours per month, 5-6 hours per day during VBS

Website Coordinator and Assistants

Website Coordinator
  1. Oversees the maintenance of church website.
  2. Ensures that website represents church’s mission statement and teachings
  3. Works with and informs pastoral staff regarding any significant updates and revisions
  4. Ensures that church calendar is updated.
  5. Provides pictures on website for activities such as VBS, school, social, etc.
  6. Develops new ways to access sermons off of website.
  7. Coordinator will meet with assistants on a regular basis to divide up tasks.

Assistants:

  1. Ensures that website represents church’s mission statement and teachings.
  2. Works with Coordinator in maintaining church calendar and providing pictures on website.
  3. Explores new ways of communicating church’s mission and beliefs on web such as pastor’s sermons, articles, etc.
  4. Meets with Coordinator on a regular basis to divide up tasks.

Appropriate Spiritual Gifts:

  • Leadership
  • Organization

Time Commitment:
The Website Team will need to devote at least 1-2 hours per week depending on time required for special programs.

Women’s Ministry Coordinator and Committee

The Bible gives great insight into the role of women. Biblical women were entrepreneurs, judges, homemakers, and Bible teachers to list only a few. Thus the Christian woman is called to live her life in terms of the great potential for the development and use of her abilities.

Christian women are compassionate with godly wisdom. They choose to act, to be voices proclaiming a better way, to be hands making a tangible difference, to work toward spiritually strengthening people already in the membership as well as the non-members in the community. Christian women are committed to changing the world through prayer and sharing their faith in the Lord.

As our model, Jesus ministered to women (Mark 7; Luke 7, 8, and 13) restoring their self-worth and value as human beings. The increasingly complex needs of women within North American society and the church make women’s ministries a key priority in the church. “They (women) can do a work that men cannot do. They can come close to the hearts of those whom men cannot reach. The labor is needed” (Evangelism, page 465). “Why may they (women) not understand their own powers, and realizing that these powers are given of God, strive to make use of them to the fullest extent in doing good to others, in advancing the work of reformation, of truth, and of real goodness in the world” (Welfare Ministries, page 161). “Let woman realize the sacredness of her work and in the strength and fear of God, take up her mission” (Testimonies for the Church, Vol. 3, page 564).

Women today are commissioned to use the talents and opportunities God has given them to fulfill His eternal plan. The responsibility of sharing the Good News is the burden of all who call themselves Christians. If the church were not to fully utilize women’s gifts the church body would be denied the internal freedom under which it flourishes best. It would be denied the benefit of the spiritual and intellectual gifts of over half of its membership. Women would experience loss and those to whom she might minister also would lose the needed help. Women’s ministries involves encouraging women to discover and use their gifts.

Women’s needs and concerns include (but are not limited to) women living balanced lifestyles, considering responsibilities within the multiple roles of home, work, husband’s work, children, church, and society; women and finances; women and self-esteem; women and decision-making; conflict resolution, and time-management.

Duties of the Women’s Ministries Coordinator and Committee:
The major tasks include the following:

  1. Leader. She chairs the Women’s Ministries committee. This responsibility is essential to the success of women’s ministries. The chair functions as a facilitator, encouraging the evolution of ideas and plans that produce efforts toward maximizing our church’s mission. The chair assembles the agenda, moderates discussion, and encourages group cohesion through personal sharing, prayer and fellowship.
  2. Committee. The committee’s purpose is to brainstorm, develop strategies, network, and assist in planning and implementing programs and activities relevant to women’s specific and varied needs. They will periodically survey and identify the needs of the women within the church and community, including spiritual growth needs and training in the promotion of outreach. Identify the demographics of the female population such as age, ethnicity, educational level, marital status, etc., and identify topics specific to their needs. Special needs may include support groups for abused women, senior citizens, single-parents, teens, substance abuse, empty-nest syndrome, and child abuse, seminars on stress management, grief recovery, parenting skills, self-improvement, spiritual care, etc. Other activities may include prayer breakfasts, literacy program, day care, and programs for the community elderly.
  3. Conference. Coordinator interacts with the Indiana Conference and NAD Women’s Ministries departments. This includes filing regular statistical reports and calendar items and participation in conference women’s ministries training events.
  4. Special Sabbath. Women’s Ministry Coordinator will plan a Women’s Ministry worship service once per year which especially addresses the needs of women. This will need to be coordinated with the pastor several months in advance.

Resource Materials
The following resources are recommended for your ministry. You can purchase these by calling AdventSource (800-328-0525), the Adventist Book Center (800-765-6955) or your local Christian bookstore.

  1. Expect Great Things: How to Be a Happy, Growing Christian, by Richard O’Ffill. A template for successful Christian living, with the goal of being like Jesus.
  2. Strengthen Your Church Through Women’s Ministries, by Tamyra Horst. How Women’s Ministries can make a difference in your church.
  3. Women’s Ministries Handbook, by North American Division Women’s Ministries Department. The complete guide to starting and supporting a ministry for and by women at the local church.
  4. Women of Spirit Magazine. Stories, ideas and reports of what women are doing in their church and community.
  5. Visit AdventSource On-Line at www.adventsource.org/women for a complete list of the latest resources available for local church leaders. You can place an order or request a catalog by calling 1-800-328-0525.
  6. For information about additional resources and answers to your questions call the Adventist Plusline at 1-800-732-7587 or visit them on-line at www.plusline.org.

Youth Leader

Adventist Youth Society Leader

AYS is the action and fellowship organization for senior youth in the local church. Under the leadership of an elected Youth leader, young people are to work together in the development of a strong youth ministry which includes spiritual, mental, and physical development of each individual. Christian social interaction, and an active witnessing program which supports the general soul-winning plans of the local church. It should be the goal of the AYS to involve all young people in meaningful activities which will tie them closer to the church and train them for useful service.

Regular meetings of the youth should be scheduled each week. It is recommended that these meetings be held Friday evening or Sabbath afternoon. Such meetings may be held in homes of responsible church members or as larger public meetings in the church. Since the youth program should not be isolated from the rest of the church, the public AYS meetings should be open to the entire church membership. Ideally, they should be planned and operated, however, by the youth themselves.

It is important that the youth program in the local church be coordinated with the work of all departments that provide ministry for children and youth. To encourage this cooperation and coordination, the PM leader, Health leader, leader of the youth SS division, school principal, Pathfinder Club director, and other leaders as needed are members of the AYS Committee, which is an umbrella organization in the local church responsible for planning the youth ministry program.

While a successful youth ministry program in the local church includes a strong youth SS school, there must be a specific time and place for more interaction, fellowship, recreation, witnessing outreach, and leadership training, which are all a part of the concepts to be fostered in the AYS.

Background Check and Online Child Safety Training:
Anyone working in Children’s ministries at Cicero Church is required to complete Shield the Vulnerable which is a background check and an online training seminar (approx. 45-60 minutes to complete) before assuming role. You may contact church office or pastoral staff to arrange for training.

  • Leadership
  • Administration
  • Passion for youth
  • Team player

Time Commitment:
Two-year term. AYS leader will spend 3-4 hours per month coordinating various youth programs.

See you at San Marcos this weekend

The Sabbath School Class: Saturdays starting at 9:30 am

Held at San Marcos Church

Worship Service: Every Saturday starting at 10:45 am

Held at San Marcos Church

Church Office Hours: Monday to Friday 9:00 am – 2:00 pm

sanmarcossda@gmail.com